Established, since 1997, leading UK based training provider.

Making 'Which one?', 'What kind?' Decisions

Making Good Decisions - Making 'Which one?', 'What kind?' Decisions

There are many, Which one? What kind? decisions to make.

  • Which one, what kind of dog should I have?
  • Which one, what kind of computer should we get?
  • Which one, what kind of holiday should we go on?

In order to make a “which one, what kind?" decision, take the following steps.

  1. Name the question. For example: Which one, what kind of car should I buy?
  2. Name the positive criteria
  3. Rank each of the criteria for importance
  4. List your top contenders
  5. Rank candidates against each of the criteria

When you have finished this decision-matrix you will have a decision that will look similar to this:

Who should get the job as the next James Bond

What are you making a decision about?
Start your question with 'Which one...', or 'What kind...'

Name the positive criteria

Think about your perfect ideal and name the qualities that each of your options would need to have.
Make sure each quality is worded in a positive manner.

For example, when thinking about buying your next car, a negative quality might be:
"I don't want to die in a crash." But instead, write: "It must have a high safety specification."

A second example: "I don't want to struggle getting the bags in the car." would be written as: "It must have a large boot."

Other positive criteria for a new car could be:

  • High degree of comfort
  • Good acceleration
  • Low emissions
  • High resale value

Write down all the positive criteria you are going to use in order to make your choice.

You will need at least three, we would suggest no more than 10.

Your question: What kind of [X] should I buy?

Enter a positive criteria:

Positive Criteria:

  • Nothing yet!

When you've thought of all the positive criteria, press:

Next Step > Next Step >

Rank each of the criteria for importance.

Your question: What kind of [X] should I buy?

Drag the slider to the correct value (or tap on a mobile device).
10 meaning "extremely important", 1 meaning "of only minor importance".
Out of ten, rank the following criteria: Criteria

List your top contenders

Now think about which are the top contenders in answer to your question: What kind of [X] should I buy?
We would suggest between 2 and 6. In our car example, the contenders might be: 'Ford Focus', 'Audi A3', 'Porsche 911'.

Enter a contender:

Contenders:

  • None yet!

When you've thought of all the contenders, press:

Next Step > Next Step >

Rank your candidates against each of the criteria

Your question: What kind of [X] should I buy?

How does the current candidate: Candidate
Rank for the criteria: Criteria?


Here is the answer to your question: I should do [X]?

    Here's how it's worked out:

    You can print this page

    You may benefit from attending our time management course.

    Need to decide about something else?

    Are you making a different type of decision? We have other decision making apps available for you to use - find out more here.

    Let's Get Social

    If you think a friend might enjoy this, please share it with them:

    Drag this button: What-One-What-Kind Decision Web-Widget to your bookmarks bar or desktop to save it for use later.

    Decision Making Articles From Our Blog

    • What is the Law of Cause and Effect? Thumbnail

      What is the Law of Cause and Effect?

      29 September 2020
      "Everything happens for a reason" is a commonly used expression, but not necessarily accurate. Everything that happens has a cause, or causes. "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction."
      What is the Law of Cause and Effect? The law of cause and effect is: "Whenever two phenomena are present together, AND always absent together, AND vary proportionately together, then the two phenomena are almost certainly causally connected". Let us discuss the law of cause and effect... "Why things happen". You have heard it said that "Everything happens for a reason". This statement is ambiguous, it...
      Continue Reading >
    • 10 Steps to Solving Problems at Work Thumbnail

      10 Steps to Solving Problems At Work

      2 September 2020
      Problem solving is an essential skill, not only at work, but in personal situations. Use these ten steps to improve your problem-solving skills. Learn how to identify the circumstances around the problem and the logical steps to take.
      10 Steps to Solving Problems at Work Ten steps to successfully solving problems in the workplace: Get the facts. Define the problem. Find the structure of the problem. Find the origin of the problem. Identify the main players. Determine the chronological sequence. Assemble resources available. Formulate a corrective plan. Intelligently implement the plan. M...
      Continue Reading >
    • Be a Straight Thinker Thumbnail

      Be a Straight Thinker

      6 March 2020
      Being able to think straight is an asset in life. We know this means making rational decisions, but what exactly does that mean in reality? You need to learn to be a critical thinker and here are four things to remember to get your thinking straight.
      Be a Straight Thinker In order to think straight, remember the following: Regardless of opinion, facts are facts. Verify your sources. Be wary of the majority opinion. Coherence; non contradiction. 1. Regardless of opinion, facts are facts. The first rule of clear thinking is to base all of your thinking upon facts. Reality is an objective absolute. It exists...
      Continue Reading >

    Customer Reviews

    Here are a selection of reviews for our training courses.

    • The course content was very interesting, some methods and techniques will be used in the future. The handbook will be useful for revision. The trainer's presentation was excellent, good time keeping and kept everyone focused throughout. Frequent change in activities and relevant examples were great.

    • The course content was extremely applicable to my job and life. It allows you to re-evaluate your thought processes. The trainer's presentation flowed and was systematic without being robotic and rigid. Was extremely clear, thorough and timely. I had a fantastic day.

    • This was an excellent course. Real life-changing, approach-changing tools provided. Definitely a must for any managers/leaders who want to achieve great results. The trainer's presentation was also excellent.

    • I found all the course content very useful, even the topics I didn't think I needed training on. The most beneficial topics were decision making, managing emotions, conflicts and communication. The trainer was very engaging, using a lot of great examples. There was not a boring moment in the two days I attended. He made sure that we left knowing exactly what we needed to work on and how we can implement the changes. Thank you!

    • Excellent content and presentation. Factual, informative and helpful. This training will help greatly when dealing with various situations within the workplace. The training presentation was brilliant; well described, with great examples where necessary. Informative and helpful. Many thanks

    • The training course content was very good, makes you think about how you talk to others and how to change. It demonstrates ways to have clear action plans to achieve targets you set yourself and the company set for you. The trainer was very knowledgeable about his subject and made it interesting and enjoyable.