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Making Yes or No Decisions

Making Good Decisions - Yes or No? (Should I - Should I Not?)

Yes or No Decisions

To make a correct decision, follow these simple steps:


First rule. Make the decision!
Don't procrastinate unnecessarily.

Write out the decision you need to make in the form of a Yes/No question.

For example:
Should I buy a dog? Yes or No?
Should I move to Australia? Yes or No?
Should I employ a new receptionist? Yes or No?

What are you making a decision about?

Enter all the reasons in favour of your decision - a yes vote.
Think about all the reasonable arguments that are in favour of a YES vote.

Now, take the opposite view and list all the reasons for voting against the decision - all the reasons for voting no.
Be methodical and put your mind totally on the task of finding all the reasons for voting no.
When you have finished, have a short mental break.

Your question: Should I do [X]?

Enter a positive reason:

Enter a negative reason:

Positive Reasons:

Negative Reasons:

  • Nothing yet!

When you've thought of all the reasons, press:

Next Step > Next Step >

You now need to rank (or weight) each reason in turn out of 100, according to how important you believe each reason to be.
In this case, 100 means very important, 0 is hardly worth mentioning.
The point is to give each reason a numerical score, out of 100.

Now repeat the process for all the reasons against.
Score each reason to give it a level of importance: 100 is maximum, 0 is minimum.
Your task is to quantify the reasons and attach a numerical value to each reason, one at a time.

Your question: Should I do [X]?

Rank the following reason out of 100: Reason Name
Drag the slider to the correct value (or tap on a mobile device).

Based on the evidence given, the answer to your question:
I should do [X]?
Has been calculated (by your weightings) as ???.

Here's how it's worked out:

    Should I do X?
    ???
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      You may benefit from attending our time management course.

      Need to decide about something else?

      Are you making a different type of decision? We have other decision making apps available for you to use - find out more here.

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      Customer Reviews

      Here are a selection of reviews for our training courses.

      • Excellent content on managing conflict. Most important part for me was 'wrong box/right box' method. Taking emotion out of conflict. Good clear presentation, very useful role playing. Helped us relate course content to ourselves individually.

      • A lot of concrete tools to use every day. Very useful and handy. Examples are clear. Participation is well balanced. Chris is dynamic and charismatic which I liked a lot. The workbook is a great support and additional handwriting is a plus to remain focused and active

      • The course was wide-ranging and very interesting, with many concepts with practical applications both in business and outside work. The trainer was very knowledgeable and enthusiastic and able to give different types of examples which made the concepts presented easier to digest.

      • This course has allowed me to gain focus in what I hope to achieve in my current job and in the future. I have also learnt that if I change my thoughts, I am able to achieve my goals. The trainer's presentation was clear and well thought out.

      • The course content was fascinating, useful and concise. The trainer's presentation was engaging, interesting, funny, inspirational, knowledgeable, respectful, friendly, energetic, highly intelligent and draws on startlingly broad frames of reference.

      • This course was excellent, very informative and containing relevant content. Plenty to put into action! Trainer's presentation was excellent. Very engaging, good use of 'real-life' examples to illustrate points.