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8 Steps to Sales Success - Sales Training

8 Steps to sales success

Would you like your business to be doing better than it is now?
Would it be a benefit if more people were to buy your product?

Yes? So here is the all-important question:

Why do people buy your product? and Why is it that more people do not buy your product?

Let us answer these questions.

Why do people buy your product?

There are eight reasons why people buy your product. They are the same eight reasons why anyone buys any product.

People by products if, and only if, they can answer yes to the following eight questions.

  1. Is your customer able to find you?
  2. Does the potential customer want or need your product?
  3. Does the potential customer think you are CAPABLE of delivering the product to the standard he she needs?
  4. Assuming the potential customer thinks you can do the job well; do you represent VALUE FOR MONEY?
  5. Assuming they think you represent good value for money, Have you made it easy to buy from you?
  6. Do you have likeable sales staff; does the potential customer LIKE the sales person?
  7. Does the buyer trust your company?
  8. Does your potential customer have the authority and courage to make a buying decision?

If you score a NO on any one of these eight questions, or on any combination of them, then your chances of selling are short circuited and the sales opportunity has blown a fuse.

Let us look a little more closely at each one.

1. Is your customer able to find you?

Your customer needs to know that you exist.

Are you a visible presence in the market place?

If you are on line, is your search engine optimisation allowing you to be seen by those people that are making relevant searches for your type of product, or not? Are they seeing you or your competitors when they go online?

If you are in the high street, are you visible? Or is your location such that nobody would know you were there, unless they already knew you.
If you are invisible nobody will see you and you won't make many sales.
If you are highly visible then more people will see you and you will make more sales.

2. Does the potential customer want or need your product?

Obviously if they don't want your product they won't buy it.
If they don't need your product then they still may buy it.
Note the difference between want and need.
Most of the products that are sold are not needs.

They are wants.

Nobody needs a Porsche.
Nobody needs perfume or cakes or bunches of flowers, or TVs or Play Stations, or magazines or chewing gum or coffee lattes or posh frocks.

We buy mostly what we want to buy.

So the question is:

To what degree have you made your product desirable?

There are two basic human desires.

  1. The desire to gain pleasure and
  2. The desire to avoid painful consequences.

If your product can do either one or both of these, then it is a desirable product.
If it can't, then it is not.
Do all you can to make your product desirable?

3. Does the potential customer think you are CAPABLE of delivering the product to the standard he- she wants and needs?

Are you good at what you do?
How can you prove that you are good at what you do?
What evidence can you give to your customers that you are fully ready, willing and able to provide the customer with what they want?
Have you got endorsements from previous satisfied customers?
Are you registered with an examining body who endorses your product?
Are you able to demonstrate your expertise and skill to a customer before they buy?
If you cannot prove you are capable, then why should your customers trust you?

If they can't feel sure that you are capable, then they won't want to buy.

Can you convince your customers that you are capable?

4. Assuming the potential customer thinks you can do the job well; do you represent VALUE FOR MONEY?

If you can do the job, how much will it cost?
You don't have to be the cheapest.
You probably should not even try to be the cheapest.
But you should be able to demonstrate that you represent good value for money.
Most people recognise that to a degree you get what you pay for.
But also most people want to get a "good deal".
They don't want to overpay.
Questions: you may not be the cheapest but how do you demonstrate that you represent good value?

5. Assuming they think you represent good value for money, Have you made it easy to buy from you?

Some people make it so difficult to do business with them that it almost is not worth it.
For example: some phones systems have you wait for ten minutes in a queue listening to terrible music whilst their entire customer service and sales staff are busy.
"Your call is important to us, that is why we are making you wait for 15 minutes".
Other organisations are user friendly.
For example: Amazon is fast and efficient and easy to do business with, that is why they are growing like crazy.
Are you user friendly? Or not?

6. Do you have likeable sales staff; does the potential customer LIKE the sales person?

The above point refers primarily to the ability of your customers to find a sales person to talk to.
But when they do find a sales person to talk to them is that sales person a likeable person. Or not.

There are very many rude sales people.
And customers don't like to buy from sales people they don't like.

Customers do like to buy from sales people they do like.
They will sometimes buy a product because they like the sales person.
Customers will leave the building if they don't like the sales person.

For example: I know a lady who did not buy a kitchen refurbishment from a dealer because the sales person assumed that the husband was the main decision maker, and talked down to the lady calling her, "my love".

That one phrase cost him a £17,000 order.
And the sad thing about it is that he does not know why she did not order it from him.
So no doubt he will repeat the same mistake again tomorrow. How sad for his employer.

Are your sales staff likeable? Or are some of them not?

7. Does the buyer trust your company?

Even if the individual is likeable is the company a trusted name in the market place.

For example:

Marks and Spencer's are trusted names in the market place.

Del Boy and Rodney are not.

Does your organisation hold a good name in the community it serves or not?

So let us assume that you have the following seven points covered:

  1. You are in the right place at the right time.
  2. You have a desirable product or service.
  3. You are fully CAPABLE of delivering the product to the high standard he/she needs?
  4. You represent good VALUE FOR MONEY.
  5. you have made it easy to buy from you.
  6. You have likeable sales staff.
  7. Your buyer trusts the brand.

The final hurdle is this:

8. Does your potential customer have the authority and courage to make a buying decision?

Some people want to buy, but cant:

They don't have the authority to make the buying decision.
They don't have the courage to make the buying decision.
They don't have the money to make the buying decisions.
You must qualify people early and try to ensure that you are not spending time and effort on prospects who:

Can't buy because they are not allowed.
Can't buy because they are too afraid to make a commitment.
Can't buy because they don't have sufficient funds.

You should try to qualify people early and ensure that you are spending time mostly with people who can buy and will buy provided you have satisfied all of the above listed conditions.

Here they are again in brief.

  1. Can they find you?
  2. Do they want what you've got?
  3. Are you capable?
  4. Are you good value for money?
  5. Are you easy?
  6. Are you likeable?
  7. Are you respectable?
  8. Are they able to manage it?

If yes, then you are in luck!

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